• Students are Fleeing Liberal Arts - How It Could Hurt the U.S.

    If there’s one thing liberal arts colleges offer, it’s critical thinking. That might be why this spring Occidental College is offering a course called Liberal Arts at the Brink? Navigating the Crisis in Higher Education. The course examines whether college liberal arts curricula like its own can survive in a time of high unemployment and rising student debt.

  • The Actual Value of a Diploma

    When we think about higher education, we often times first think about the rising costs of college and the student loan debt incurred thereafter. But the reality is that the actual value of a diploma far exceeds the amount we pay for it.

  • The Actual Value of a Diploma

    When we think about higher education, we often times first think about the rising costs of college and the student loan debt incurred thereafter. But the reality is that the actual value of a diploma far exceeds the amount we pay for it.

  • Gun sanity needs bipartisanship

    The first and most important victory for advocates of sensible gun laws would, on almost any other matter, seem trivial. But when it comes to firearms, it’s huge: Since the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School, attention to the issue has not waned and pressure for action has not diminished.

  • Millennials Face Bleak Future Without College Degree

    Given the growing importance of higher education, experts say that millennials - individuals between the ages of 18 and 34 - who do not go to college will almost surely face many obstacles throughout their lives. As Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce put it, "It's remarkable how much trouble they're in," The Associated Press (AP) reports.

  • College Diversity Study Finds Segregation Persists in Higher Education

    Studying more than 40 years of data on black and white students at every four-year college in the U.S., Georgetown University professor Peter Hinrichs found that while desegregation led to significant changes on campus in the late 1960s and early 1970s, diversity has slowed in the four decades since.

  • The real deficit argument

    Should our politicians dedicate themselves to solving the problems we face now? Or should they spend their time constructing largely theoretical deficit solutions for years far in the future to satisfy certain ideological and aesthetic urges?

  • Measures of Segregation

    Court decisions dating to the 1950s theoretically ended racial segregation of higher education in the United States. But data to be presented today at the annual meeting of the American Economic Association show that the pace of desegregation has slowed over time. And in a finding that could be controversial, the study finds that states that ban the consideration of race in admissions may see the pace of desegregation accelerate.

  • The cliff deal is better than it looks

    Obama has to prove wrong both his skeptical allies and foes inclined to underestimate him. He needs to move the discussion away from a green-eyeshade debate over budgets and foster a larger conversation over what it will take to restore broadly shared economic growth. His presidency really does depend on how he handles the next two months.

  • NPR's On Ponit: The Fiscal Cliff (Audio)

    When the clock strikes midnight, the country could plunge over the fiscal cliff. Extended unemployment benefits cut. Payroll taxes up. Markets on edge. And more pain to come. So, what’s it going to take to make a deal? Is this really how the New Year will start?