Keynote Speaker: Dr. Edward Latessa

 

Current Research/What We Know (Plenary)

Moderator:

Portrait of Shay Bilchik

Shay Bilchik
Director, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Elizabeth Cauffman

Dr. Elizabeth Cauffman
Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow, Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, School of Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine

Denise Herz

Denise Herz
Director and Full Professor, School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, California State University Los Angeles

Portrait of Abram Rosenblatt

Abram Rosenblatt, Ph.D.
Senior Study Director, Westat

Portrait of Dr. Ivory Toldson

Dr. Ivory Toldson
President and CEO, Quality Education for Minorities Network

Portrait of Jennifer Woolard

Jennifer Woolard, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology, Georgetown University

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Moving from Research to Policy and Practice (Plenary)

Moderator:

Portrait of Karen Pittman

Karen Pittman
Co-Founder, President and CEO, Forum for Youth Investment

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Gary Blau

Gary Blau, Ph.D.
Chief, Child, Adolescent, and Family Branch, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Portrait of Paul Cruz, Ph.D.

Paul Cruz, Ph.D.
Superintendent, Austin Independent School District

Portrait of Hon. Stacy Boulware Eurie

Hon. Stacy Boulware Eurie
Presiding Juvenile Court Judge, Superior Court of CA, County of Sacramento

Portrait of Jane Kallal

Jane Kallal
Executive Director, Family Involvement Center

Portrait of Fariborz Pakseresht

Fariborz Pakseresht
Director, Oregon Youth Authority

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Advances in Child Welfare (Breakout)

Moderator:

Portrait of Macon Stewart

Macon Stewart
Senior Program Manager, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Marc Cherna

Marc Cherna
Director, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

Portrait of Mark Courtney

Mark Courtney, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago

Portrait of Michelle Francois Traiman

Michelle Francois Traiman
Director, National Center for Youth Law’s Foster Youth Education Initiative, Foster Ed

Emily Hinkle

Emily Hinkle
Independent Living Program Life Skills and My Life coach, PDX-Connect at New Avenues for Youth

Portrait of Lorrie Lutz

Lorrie Lutz
Chief Strategy Officer, FEDCAP

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Suspension and Expulsion Policies and Practices (Breakout)

Moderator:

Portrait of Simon Gonsoulin

Simon Gonsoulin
Principal Researcher, American Institutes for Research

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Kevin Bethel, MS

Kevin Bethel

Senior Policy Advisor, Stoneleigh Foundation Fellow, Juvenile Justice Research Reform Lab, Department of Psychology, Drexel University

Portrait of Ramona Bishop

Ramona Bishop, Ph.D.
Superintendent, Vallejo City Unified School District

Portrait of Daniel Kim

Daniel Kim
Director of Youth Organizing, Padres and Jovenes Unidos

Portrait of Russell Skiba

Russell Skiba, Ph.D.
Director, The Equity Project and Professor, Indiana University

Portrait of Judge Steven Teske

Hon. Steven Teske
Chief Judge, Juvenile Court of Clayton County, Georgia

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Youth Corrections Reform (Breakout)

Moderator:

Portrait of Michael Umpierre

Michael Umpierre
Senior Research Fellow, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Hernan Carvante

Hernan Carvente
Program Analyst, Youth Justice, Vera Institute of Justice

Portrait of Courtney Collier

Courtney Collier
Deputy Director, Department of Social Services, Missouri Division of Youth Services

Portrait of Kelly Dedel, Ph.D.

Kelly Dedel, Ph.D.
Director, One in 37 Research, Inc.

Portrait of Peter Forbes

Peter Forbes
Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Youth Services

Portrait of Ed Mulvey

Ed Mulvey, Ph.D.
Professor, University of Pittsburgh Department of Psychiatry

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Research-Based Approaches for Multi-System Youth (Breakout)

Moderator:

Portrait of Shay Bilchik

Shay Bilchik
Director, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Hon. Darlene Byrne

Hon. Darlene Byrne
Presiding Judge, Travis County, Texas

Portrait of Tim Decker

Tim Decker
Director, Children's Division, Missouri Department of Social Services

Denise Herz

Denise Herz
Director and Full Professor, School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, California State University Los Angeles

Portrait of Lourdes Rosado

Lourdes Rosado
Bureau Chief, Civil Rights Bureau

Portrait of Raphael Weston

Raphael Weston
Youth and Young Adult Transition Coordinator, National Alliance on Mental Illness

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Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Youth-Serving Systems (Breakout)

Moderator:

Portrait of Kris Henning

Kris Henning
Director, Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative, Agnes N. Williams Research Professor of Law, Georgetown Law

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Rita Cameron Wedding, Ph.D

Rita Cameron Wedding, Ph.D
Professor, Sacramento State University - California

Portrait of Jeff Gregro

Jeffrey Gregro
Deputy Chief, Juvenile Probation Office, Berks County, PA

Portrait of Madge Pat Mosby

Madge Pat Mosby
Retired System of Care Family Coach and Trainer, The Institute of Innovation and Implementation, University of Maryland Division of Social Work 

Portrait of Mark Soler

Mark Soler
Executive Director, Center for Children’s Law and Policy

Portrait of Hon. Louis Trosch

Hon. Louis Trosch
District Court Judge, 26th Judicial District, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

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Advances in Trauma-Informed Approaches Across Systems of Care (Breakout)

Moderator:

Portrait of Michael Umpierre

Michael Umpierre
Senior Research Fellow, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform

 

 

Panelists:

Portrait of Keith Cruise

Keith Cruise, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Co-Director, Clinical Forensic Specialization, Department of Psychology at Fordham University

Portrait of Michael Howard

Judge Michael Howard
Former Administrative Judge, Domestic Relations Division, Stark County, OH

Portrait of Helen Jones-Kelley

Helen Jones-Kelley
Executive Director of the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board for Montgomery County, Ohio

Portrait of Monique Marrow, Ph.D.

Monique Marrow, Ph.D.
Principal Owner, Youth Trauma and Justice Solutions

Portrait of Nyamuon Nguany

Moon Nguany
Regional Coordinator, Youth Move Maine

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What We’ve Learned from Implementation (Plenary)

Moderator:

Portrait of Carolyn Hill

Dr. Carolyn Hill
Senior Fellow, MDRC

 

 

Panelist:

Portrait of Jodi Sandfort

Jodi Sandfort
Professor, University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs

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Speaker Bios

Kevin J. Bethel
Senior Policy Advisor, Stoneleigh Foundation Fellow, Juvenile Justice Research Reform Lab, Department of Psychology, Drexel University

Kevin J. Bethel is a retired Deputy Police Commissioner in the Philadelphia Police Department, the 4th largest police department in the nation with over 6,600 sworn personnel. Prior to his retirement in January 2016, Bethel commanded Patrol Operation’s for the entire city. This appointment included oversight of the 21 Patrol Districts, Neighborhood Services Unit, Philadelphia School District Police and Community Relations Unit. Previous assignments throughout his 29 years of service with the Philadelphia Police Department include, positions within the Special Investigative Bureau, Narcotics Strike Force, Narcotics Field Unit, Narcotics Intelligence Investigative Unit and the Internal Affairs Division as well as Commanding Officer of the 17th Police District. Among his many responsibilities, Kevin has done extensive work in the Juvenile Justice Field; most recently developed a School Diversion Program within the Philadelphia School System. The program diverts first time, low-level juvenile offenders by utilizing programs within the Department of Human Services. In its first year, the program reduced the number of school arrests by 54 percent. Bethel serves on various committees and boards in the field of juvenile justice. He testified before the President’s 21st Century Task Force, co-chaired by Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey on the need for a concerted effort by law enforcement leaders to address the school-to-prison pipeline across the nation. He currently serves on the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency Disproportionate Minority Contact Subcommittee and is a former member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Law and Justice Committee. He is also a member of the Youth Violence Collaborative and Youth Engagement for the National League of Cities Collaboration, the Philadelphia Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative, a faculty member for the International Association of Chiefs of Police Juvenile Justice Leadership Institute, and a regular lecturer, on school diversion and racial and ethnic disparities at Georgetown University, In addition to his formal education, Bethel has benefited from extensive specialized law enforcement training such as the Leadership and Specialized Training Course - Class 208, as well as the FBI National Executive Institute Session XXXIV at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) National Academy in Quantico, VA. Kevin has received numerous accolades and awards throughout his 29 years in the Police Department, which includes his selection as the recipient of the Philadelphia Daily News 2008 Fencl Award. The Fencl Award is bestowed upon a police officer that brings a unique blend of courage, integrity and determination to the job. Kevin Bethel holds a Masters Degree in Public Safety from St. Joseph's University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice from Chestnut Hill College. He is also a member of the Chestnut Hill Libris Society, an honor given to graduates of the College who distinguish themselves in their personal and professional lives while exemplifying the College motto; Fides. Caritas. Scientia. - Faith. Charity. Knowledge.

Ramona Bishop, Ph.D.
Superintendent, Vallejo City Unified School District

Dr. Bishop graduated from John F. Kennedy High School in Richmond and received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Berkeley. She earned her teaching credential from the University of San Francisco where she was student of the year. She earned her Master's Degree and administrative credential from California State University, Hayward. She was awarded a doctorate in educational administration from the University of Pacific.

Prior to becoming Superintendent of Vallejo City Unified School District, Dr. Bishop served as Associate Superintendent for Educational Services in the Twin Rivers Unified School District. Her professional career also includes teaching, serving as principal, director, assistant superintendent and superintendent in several urban school districts.

Colleagues and community members have recognized Dr. Bishop for her excellence in education.

In July 2015, Dr. Bishop was invited to be a speaker at the White House Rethink School Discipline convening. She spoke on the ongoing work the Vallejo staff is engaged in to create safe learning environments for all student using research-based restorative practices.

Dr. Bishop received many awards and serves on a number of boards and committees including but not limited to: 2016 President California Association of African American Superintendents & Administrators

  • 2016 President, California Association of African American Superintendents & Administrators (CAAASA) 
 
  • EdSource, Board of Directors 

  • Linked Learning Community Board of Directors 

  • Linked Learning Superintendent’s Council – Vice Chair 

  • California School Boards Association, Superintendents' Council 

  • Association of California Administrators, Superintendents' Council 

  • Solano Economic Development corporation, Board of Directors 

  • Vallejo Education and Business Alliance, Board of Directors 

  • In 2014, she was appointed by Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye to the statewide Keeping Kids in School 
and out of Court Task Force 

  • 2014 California School Board Association's Golden Bell Award Recipient for Full Service Community 
Schools Program 

  • 2014 National Leadership Award - Full Service Community Schools Program 

  • 2010 National Alliance of Black School Educators - Ida B. Wells Risk-Taker Award 

  • 2008 Region 3 Superintendent of the Year, Association of California School Administrators 

  • 2007 Distinguished Educator, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated
  • 2000 Governor's Performance Award, California Department of Education Teacher Education Student of the Year, University of San Francisco

Dr. Bishop was chosen as Superintendent of Vallejo City Unified in February 2011 after a nationwide search which resulted in more than three dozen applicants. Her first official day in the District was April 1, 2011. Since then, with the support and leadership of the VCUSD Board, she has led the district team on an aggressive reform agenda. Vallejo City Unified School District is implementing:

  • Full Service Community Schools 

  • Innovative Elementary and K-8 Programs 

  • Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics Middle Schools 

  • Wall-to-Wall College/Career Academies at the Comprehensive High Schools 


Gary Blau, Ph.D.
Chief, Child, Adolescent, and Family Branch, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Gary M. Blau, Ph.D. is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and is currently the Chief of the Child, Adolescent and Family Branch at the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). In this role he provides national leadership for children’s mental health and for creating “systems of care” across the United States. Prior to this, Dr. Blau was the Bureau Chief of Quality Management and Director of Mental Health at the Connecticut Department of Children and Families (DCF), and the Director of Clinical Services at the Child and Family Agency of Southeastern, Connecticut.

Dr. Blau has been selected and appointed to numerous positions, including Chairperson of the National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Division of Children, Youth and Families and Clinical Faculty at the Yale Child Study Center. He has also received many awards, including the prestigious Pro Humanitate Literary Award “for literary works which best exemplify the intellectual integrity and moral courage required to transcend political and social barriers to promote best practice in the field of child welfare,” the Governor’s Service Award in Connecticut, the Phoebe Bennet Award for outstanding contribution to children’s mental health in Connecticut, and the Making a Difference Award presented by Connecticut’s Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health. He was also proud that upon the occasion of his leaving Connecticut, the Governor proclaimed December 12, 2003, as ‘Dr. Gary Blau Day.”

For his national work, Dr. Blau received the Outstanding Achievement Award presented by the National Association for Children’s Behavioral Health, and was the recipient of the 2009 HHS Secretary’s Award for Meritorious Service for his national leadership in children’s mental health. In 2011, he was the first recipient of the Rock Star Award, presented by Youth M.O.V.E., National for “being a true champion for the youth movement and advocate for youth voice.” This award has now been named the “Dr. Gary Blau Award” and is given yearly to a mental health professional who has distinguished themselves as a voice for youth. He was also the 2013 recipient of the SAMHSA Administrator’s Award for “unparalleled and innovative leadership in children’s mental health” and the 2016 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) “Spirit Award” for being “an outstanding HHS employee who is making a real difference in the Department.”

Dr. Blau has over 50 professional publications and is the editor of seven books. His latest volume is titled, “Residential Interventions for Children, Adolescents and Families: A Best Practice Guide.” Other books include a volume co-edited with Dr. Sylvia Fisher and Dr. Jeff Poirier, “Improving Emotional and Behavioral Outcomes for LGBT Youth;” a book he co-edited with Dr. Phyllis Magrab titled, “The Leadership Equation: Strategies for Individuals who are Champions for Children, Youth and Families,” a book co-edited with Beth Stroul, titled, “The System of Care Handbook: Transforming Mental Health Services for Children, Youth and Families,” and a book co-edited with Thomas Gullotta titled, “The Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment.” Dr. Blau received his Ph.D. from Auburn University (Auburn, Alabama) in 1988. He is happily married since December of 1982 to his best friend, Gwenn Blau, and they are incredibly proud of their wonderful children, Jennifer and her husband, Riley (and their sons, Logan and Evan), and Andrew and his wife, Kristina.

Hon. Stacy Boulware Eurie
Presiding Juvenile Court Judge, Superior Court of CA, County of Sacramento

Judge Stacy Boulware Eurie was appointed to the Superior Court of Sacramento County in 2007 by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and has served as presiding judge of its juvenile court since 2010. Before her appointment to the bench, she served in the California Office of the Attorney General. And before starting her career in the public sector, she was an associate attorney in a private criminal defense firm.

Judge Boulware Eurie is currently vice chair of the Chief Justice's Keeping Kids in School and Out of Court Initiative Steering Committee; serves on the Executive Committee of the Commission on the Future of California's Court System; and sits on the California Child Welfare Council. In recent years, Judge Boulware Eurie has served as a volunteer on several council advisory bodies, including the Advisory Committee on Financial Accountability and Efficiency for the Judicial Branch, and the California Blue Ribbon Commission on Children in Foster Care.

Judge Stacy Boulware Eurie was appointed to succeed council member Justice Martin J. Tangeman, who was elevated to the Court of Appeal in 2016.

Hon. Darlene Byrne
Presiding Judge, Travis County, Texas

Darlene Byrne has served as Judge of the 126th Judicial District Court in Travis County, Texas since January 2001. Prior to her election in 2000, she practiced law for thirteen years in the areas of employment, commercial and governmental entity litigation. In 2012, Judge Byrne was reelected to her fourth term as Judge.

Judge Byrne is a graduate of the University of Houston Law Center where she graduated Magna Cum Laude, was a member of the Order of the Coif and where she was on the editorial staff of the Houston Law Review.

She currently serves as the Senior Judicial Advisor of the Supreme Court of Texas’ Permanent Judicial Commission for Children Youth and Families. She is also immediate past President of the Board of Trustees of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) and serves on the Editorial Staff for the NCJFCJ Journal. She is the Former Chair of the Oversight Committee for the Office of Parent Representation and Office of Child Representation (two public defender-type law offices for families and children involved in child welfare cases, which Judge Byrne helped establish). She also served as the Chair of the Travis County Juvenile Justice Board from 2009-2012. She founded and is the lead judge for the Travis County Model Court for Children and Families. She is the supervising judge, former presiding judge, and is a founding team member of the Travis County Family Drug Treatment Court.

Judge Byrne is proud to have been recognized as the recipient of the 2015 National CASA Judge of the Year Award, the 2011 Judge of the Year by CASA of Travis County, 2008 Texas CASA Lone Star Proud Judge of the Year Award , 2013 recipient of the Travis County Women’s Lawyer Association’s Pathfinder Award, 2009 recipient of their Outstanding Achievement Award and the 2005 recipient of their Government Service Award. She also received the 2016 Believer Award from the University of Houston Law Center’s Center for Children, Law & Policy as well as the Austin Child Guidance Center’s 2013 Austin Icon for Children Award. She was honored as one of the 2016 “Austin’s Fab 5” by the Seedling Foundation. She received the 2009 recipient of the YWCA of Greater Austin’s Woman of the Year Award in the area of racial justice.

Judge Byrne is also an Austin Bar Foundation Founding Life Fellow and a Fellow of the Texas Bar Foundation. She served as a co-chair for the Austin Do the Write Thing Challenge from 2008 to 2011. She has served as co-chair of the 2008 and 2009 Law Day celebrations of the Austin Bar Association (“ABA”), as past co-chair of the ABA Vanishing Jury Trial Committee, as past Secretary of the Texas Administrative and Public Law Council for the State Bar of Texas, as the 2005 Judicial Chair of the Austin Bar Foundation Gala, and as chair and member of numerous Committees and Advisory Boards for the NCJFCJ. In her role as a mom and community member, she was a board member of GenAustin (Girls Empowerment Network), a past chair of Ballet Austin Barre, a past Board Member and Treasurer for the Austin Rape Crisis Center (Safe Place), and is a graduate of Leadership Austin.

Judge Byrne is the mother of three wonderful young adults (Erin, Conor, and Devin) and is the proud spouse of Dan Byrne of Fritz, Byrne, Head and Fitzpatrick, L.L.P.

Rita Cameron Wedding, Ph.D
Professor, Sacramento State University - California

Rita Cameron Wedding, Ph.D. is a professor of Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies at Sacramento State University (California). Dr. Cameron Wedding’s curriculum Implicit Bias: Impact on Decision-Making, has been used to train judges, public defenders, practitioners in child welfare, juvenile justice, law enforcement and education in jurisdictions throughout the country since 2005. As a faculty for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ), she has trained judges at court improvement initiatives in over 40 states. In 2010 Dr. Cameron Wedding was featured in the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (OJJDP) website which showcased her work for “content, expertise and platform excellence.”

In California 2009-11, she directed the Regional Training Project funded by the California Board of State and Community Corrections. This training project utilized an inter-disciplinary advisory board composed of educators, social workers and law enforcement personnel to design an effective curriculum to mitigate the effects of the School to Prison Pipeline. This project delivered 43 trainings to identify practices that contribute to negative school outcomes that put students at increased risk of juvenile justice involvement.

Dr. Cameron Wedding’s work includes trainings and keynotes on implicit bias for the Texas New Judges College, the National Association of Children’s Counsel, the Family Court of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, Child Abuse and Neglect Institutes in Reno, Louisville, and Atlanta, the New York State Judicial Institute and Superior Court Judges for Hawaii and Illinois. Dr. Cameron Wedding has provided Train the Trainer Institutes, webinars, and curriculum development for various states including Indiana, conducted trainings in Maryland and multiple California probation departments. In addition Dr. Cameron Wedding has used her implicit bias expertise to provided expert testimony before the U.S. Commission on Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities, various legislative hearings and as a consultant for the Annie E. Casey Foundation, one of the largest child advocacy programs in the country. In 2017, her curriculum on implicit bias will be incorporated into the police de-escalation curriculum for Fight Crime Invest In Kids and used to train over 5000 in-service and academy officers in the U.S.

As a Fulbright Scholar Dr. Cameron Wedding conducted research in Tanzania and South Africa. In 2005 and 2007 she spoke on a national talk radio show in Johannesburg and Cape Town South Africa. In 2008 she taught at the United Nations University for Peace in Costa Rica and the United Nations University International Leadership Institute Conference on the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict in Amman Jordan. In 2014 she delivered a talk at an international conference in Athens Greece. She serves on the governing board of Global Majority, an organization dedicated to peace and conflict resolution throughout the world.

In 2012 Dr. Cameron Wedding was the recipient of the John C. Livingston Distinguished Faculty Lecture Award, the highest faculty honor awarded by Sacramento State University.

Her most recent article on implicit bias “Implicit Bias: More Than Just a Few Bad Apples” was published in the Juvenile Justice Exchange (June 15, 2016).

Hernan Carvente
Program Analyst, Youth Justice, Vera Institute of Justice

Hernan Carvente is a Program Analyst for the Center on Youth Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice, where he works on program development, improving conditions of confinement, and incorporating youth and family partnerships in facility-based and statewide juvenile justice policy reform. Mr. Carvente has conducted trainings with diverse stakeholders such as policymakers, researchers, students, and professionals in probation, child welfare, juvenile justice and corrections. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo appointed Mr. Carvente to the New York State Juvenile Justice Advisory Group (NYS JJAG) and the Citizens Policy and Complain Review Council (CPCRC). Mr. Carvente also currently serves as the Acting Youth Chair for the Coalition for Juvenile Justice’s (CJJ) Emerging Leaders Committee, as well as a member on advisory boards with the National Academies of Science and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. His passion for criminal justice system reform stems from his own personal experience in the juvenile justice system. Mr. Carvente was awarded the “Next Generation Champion for Change Award” by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the “Spirit of Youth Award” by CJJ and. He graduated from the CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice with a degree in criminal justice and is a first-generation Mexican American, who was the first male in his family to graduate from college.

Elizabeth Cauffman
Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow, Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, School of Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine

Elizabeth Cauffman is a Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior in the School of Social Ecology and holds courtesy appointments in the School of Education and the School of Law. Dr.Cauffman received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Temple University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Center on Adolescence at Stanford University. She has published over 100 articles, chapters, and books on a range of topics in the study of contemporary adolescence, including adolescent brain development, risk-taking and decision-making, parent-adolescent relationships, and juvenile justice. Findings from Dr. Cauffman’s research were incorporated into the American Psychological Association’s amicus briefs submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court in Roper v. Simmons, which abolished the juvenile death penalty, and in both Graham v. Florida and Miller v. Alabama, which placed limits on the use of life without parole as a sentence for juveniles. As part of her larger efforts to help research inform practice and policy, she served as a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice and currently directs the Center for Psychology & Law at UCI (http://psychlaw.soceco.uci.edu/).

Marc Cherna
Director, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

Marc Cherna has served as Director of the Allegheny County Department of Human Services (DHS) for 20 years. In that role, he has implemented system-wide changes that have resulted in significant improvement in outcomes for vulnerable children and families. Under Mr. Cherna’s direction, the DHS has received numerous awards and national recognition for their work. He has also received many personal awards including the Casey Family Program’s first Lifetime Achievement in Child Welfare Leadership Award, The American Public Human Services Administration’s Betsey Rosenbaum award for Excellence in Child Welfare Administration and the Coleman award for Excellence in Community Service from the Institute of Politics. He serves on numerous boards and committees, including the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Social Work’s Board of Visitors, the University of Pittsburgh’s Institute of Politics Board of Fellows, the American Public Human Services Administrators Leadership Council, and the Mayor of Philadelphia’s Community Oversight Board.

Marc began his career in human services as a youth worker over 40 years ago. He has extensive experience in the field, including 13 years as an Assistant Director with the New Jersey Department of Human Services.

Courtney Collier
Deputy Director, Department of Social Services, Missouri Division of Youth Services

Courtney Collier is the Deputy Director for the Department of Social Services, Missouri Division of Youth Services. The vision of the Missouri Division of Youth Services (DYS) is that every young person served by Missouri DYS will become a productive citizen and lead a fulfilling life. The division provides residential and non-residential care, community-based services, and aftercare supervision. Youth are committed to DYS from 46 judicial circuits with the state of Missouri. Courtney has been employed with DYS for 24 years. Her first position was Youth Specialist, a DYS front line position. She has held numerous leadership and management positions in all residential levels of care with many years in secure care. She served as Regional Administrator over the division’s Northwest Region for over 6 years. In November 2008, she was named Deputy Director, responsible for leadership development, quality improvement, and residential operations statewide. She also provides regional supervision for the vision’s St. Louis and Northwest Regions. Courtney has done consulting work with juvenile justice reform and has been directly involved with hosting numerous visits from other states to tour Missouri DYS programs and learn more about Missouri’s treatment approach.

Mark Courtney, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago

Mark E. Courtney is a Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. His fields of special interest are child welfare policy and services, the connection between child welfare services and other institutions serving families living in poverty, the transition to adulthood for vulnerable populations, and the professionalization of social work. He is a faculty affiliate of Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, which he served as Director from 2001 to 2006. He has also served on the faculties of the University of Wisconsin (1992-2000) and University of Washington (2007-2010). Dr. Courtney is a Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. Dr. Courtney received the 2010 Peter W. Forsythe Award for leadership in public child welfare from the National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators and the 2015 Distinguished Career Achievement Award from the Society for Social Work and Research. He obtained his MSW and Ph.D. degrees from the School of Social Welfare at the University of California at Berkeley. Before moving into academia, he worked for several years in various capacities providing group home care to abused and neglected adolescents. Dr. Courtney has served as a consultant to the federal government, state departments of social services, local public and private child welfare agencies, and the philanthropic community.

Keith Cruise, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Co-Director, Clinical Forensic Specialization, Department of Psychology at Fordham University

Keith Cruise is an Associate Professor and Co-Director of the Clinical-Forensic Specialization in the Department of Psychology at Fordham University. He holds a PhD in clinical psychology from the University of North Texas and a Masters of Legal Studies degree from the University of Nebraska. Dr. Cruise conducts research on the clinical-forensic assessment of youth within the juvenile justice system. Various research projects have focused on developing and validating specialized risk assessment protocols, investigating the utility of mental health screening instruments with justice-involved youth, and understanding the connection between trauma exposure, trauma reactions, and delinquent behavior. Dr. Cruise’s clinical-forensic practice has involved providing direct care assessment and treatment services with justice-involved youth conducting post-disposition assessments of risk and treatment amenability, providing expert testimony to juvenile courts, and providing technical assistance and consultation to local and state juvenile justice systems in implementing trauma-informed screening and assessment practices. Dr. Cruise is a co-investigator on a grant from the National Institute of Justice to examine the effectiveness of enhanced mental health screening for poly-victimization in justice-involved youth, co-principal investigator on a grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention investigating the impact of trauma screening on service delivery and legal outcomes for justice-involved youth and is a co-director of the Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice (CTRJJ), a technical assistance center that is part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN).

Paul Cruz, Ph.D.
Superintendent, Austin Independent School District

Dr. Paul Cruz is superintendent of the Austin Independent School District, which has more than 12,000 employees serving nearly 83,000 students in 130 schools and other facilities. Prior to becoming superintendent, Dr. Cruz served as the district’s Chief Schools Officer and was instrumental in the establishment of Early College High School, Family Resource Centers, alternative pathways to graduation, single-gender schools, and other district initiatives. In his 28 year career, Dr. Cruz has worked as a teacher, campus administrator and central office administrator in Corpus Christi, San Antonio and south Texas. He was a superintendent of schools in Laredo ISD and served as the deputy commissioner for dropout prevention at the Texas Education Agency. Dr. Cruz and his wife, Diana, a former teacher, have four children.

Tim Decker
Director, Children's Division, Missouri Department of Social Services

Tim Decker was appointed as the Director of the Missouri Division of Youth Services in January 2007 and transitioned to Director of the Missouri Children’s Division in November 2013. For the past 29 years he has served in a variety of leadership positions with the Missouri Department of Social Services and the Greater Kansas City Local Investment Commission (LINC); one of Missouri’s innovative public/private community partnerships focused on citizen engagement, local governance, natural helping networks, and neighborhood-based services.

Tim previously served as a program manager and administrator with the Division of Youth Services from 1984-1993. During this time, the agency was engaged in major system transformation toward more humane, therapeutic, developmental, and effective approaches to juvenile justice. Tim managed programs throughout Missouri’s continuum of care including community, moderate and secure care facilities; serving as an Assistant Regional Administrator in the Northwest Region.

Tim worked from 1994-1995 with the Missouri Family & Community Trust statewide system change initiative; and has served as a social worker, trainer, and treatment coordinator with agencies in the private non-profit sector. Tim was certified as a national trainer for Families and Schools Together from 1999-2007, exemplary model prevention program with the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP).

Tim earned his degree in Social Work and Psychology in 1982 from Park University in Parkville, Missouri and completed the Institute for Education Leadership Education Policy Fellowship Program in 2007.

Tim serves as a frequent presenter on topics such as juvenile justice reform, results-based accountability, family and community engagement; and organizational leadership, management, and culture change.

Kelly Dedel, Ph.D.
Director, One in 37 Research, Inc.

For over 15 years, Dr. Dedel has served as a court-appointed monitor for litigation involving the conditions of confinement for juveniles in detention and correctional facilities. Her areas of expertise include protection from harm (e.g., violence reduction, programming and behavior management), suicide prevention, special education and quality assurance.

While litigation is rarely a pleasant experience for those involved, Dr. Dedel embraces the opportunity to help Defendants accomplish the reforms in a way that best suits their philosophy, resources, and staff and youth cultures. Her monitoring strategy comes with a commitment to technical assistance and to helping systems develop an internal capacity to identify and respond to their problems, so that court oversight becomes unnecessary. She currently serves on the monitoring team in Nunez v. City of New York, focusing on the conditions of confinement for young inmates at Rikers Island. She has also served as the monitor for Los Angeles County’s juvenile probation camps and the State of Ohio’s secure juvenile correctional facilities, among others. Across the span of her career, she has worked with approximately 90 facilities.

In addition to her work as a monitor, Dr. Dedel, along with Georgetown University’s Center for Juvenile Justice Reform, created a practice model for youth in secure custody. This project includes both a monograph and an opportunity for demonstration sites to receive technical assistance to improve their practices surrounding youth in secure custody. Dr. Dedel also conducts research on objective risk classification instruments (e.g., construction and validation) and serves as a technical assistance provider on risk assessment for the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI). She is a Coach for the Performance-Based Standards project (PbS), a data-driven improvement model that holds juvenile agencies and facilities to the highest standards for operations, programs and services.

Dr. Dedel is on the Advisory Board of Stop Solitary for Kids, and in 2009, won the American Probation and Parole Association’s University of Cincinnati Award for her outstanding contributions to the field.

Dr. Dedel earned Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology (with Honors) and Criminal Justice, both from the University of Richmond, Virginia. She received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Center for Psychological Studies in Berkeley, California. Upon earning her doctorate, Dr. Dedel became a Senior Research Associate with the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, and later was a Founding Partner of the Institute for Crime, Justice and Corrections at the George Washington University. Since 2003, she has worked as the Director of One in 37 Research, Inc., a consulting firm currently based in Cody, Wyoming.

Peter Forbes
Commissioner, Massachusetts Director of Youth Services

Peter Forbes was appointed Commissioner for the Massachusetts Department of Youth Services (DYS) in June 2013. In February of 2015 he was re-appointed as the DYS Commissioner by the Executive Office of Health and Human Service Secretary Mary Lou Sudders and Governor Charlie Baker.

Commissioner Forbes’ long-standing service to DYS began in January of 1983 when he was first hired as a direct-care worker at a long term secure treatment program in Boston. Later in his career Peter served as the DYS Regional Director for Boston for more than 10 years. In that role, Commissioner Forbes established a series of constructive relationships with public agency and community based partners.

Commissioner Forbes remains committed to sustaining efforts that ensure low-risk youth do not penetrate the deep end of the juvenile justice system, and that youth in custody receive appropriate and effective services where and when they need them most.

Priorities for the agency under Peter’s stewardship include educational attainment and employment and training opportunities for the youth in the custody of the Department with the long term goal of improving public safety and reducing recidivism. Peter has focused the agency efforts to improve data entry and quality directed at positive youth outcomes.

Peter holds a Master of Science in Human Services College of Public and Community Service at the University of Massachusetts, Boston and an undergraduate degree in Sociology from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

Jeffrey Gregro
Deputy Chief, Juvenile Probation Office, Berks County, PA

Jeffrey Gregro is the Deputy Chief of the Berks County, PA Juvenile Probation Office. He earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice from Alvernia College. Prior to working for the juvenile probation office, he was employed at the Berks County Youth Center as a Youth Care Worker and the YMCA Youth Outreach Project, an alternative education program, as a counselor. Jeff currently oversees the development and utilization of community based and residential services for the juvenile probation office. While leading the probation office’s involvement in the MacArthur Foundation’s Models for Change DMC Initiative he was responsible for developing the county’s evening reporting center, which was awarded the PA Juvenile Court Judges Commission Program of the Year. He was also Chairman of the YMCA Youth Services Branch Board of Directors, Co-Chair of the PA Council of Chief Juvenile Probation Officers Family Involvement Committee which published A Family Guide to Pennsylvania’s Juvenile Justice System, and is currently Co-Chair of the PA Standardized Program Evaluation Protocol (SPEP) Advisory Committee which is aligned with Pennsylvania’s involvement with the Juvenile Justice System Improvement Project through Georgetown University. Jeff is also a Level 2 Trainer of the Standardized Program Evaluation Protocol, one of only 7 trainers in the United States certified by Dr. Mark Lipsey.

Simon Gonsoulin
Principal Researcher, American Institutes for Research

Simon Gonsoulin is a principal researcher at the American Institutes for Research concentrating his work in the areas of education, mental health and juvenile justice. Mr. Gonsoulin serves as the Project Director for the National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected and Delinquent. (NDTAC). The mission of the training and technical assistance (TTA) center is to improve educational programming for neglected and delinquent youth. NDTAC is funded by the U. S. Department of Education to develop a uniform evaluation model for State education agency Title 1, Part D, Subpart 1 programs, provide technical assistance to states in order to increase capacity for data collection and their ability to use the data to improve educational programming for youth who are neglected, delinquent, or at risk, and facilitate communication and collaboration between different organizations, agencies, and other stakeholders that work with this population. Additionally, Mr. Gonsoulin has acted as the juvenile justice resource specialist for the Technical Assistance Partnership (TAP). TAP was responsible for providing technical assistance to System of Care Communities around the country. In this capacity he worked directly with SOC Communities that have identified young adults of transition age, at -risk and juvenile justice involved youth as a population of focus in their grant and six year strategic plan. SOC Communities are funded through the Substance Abuse, Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Mr. Gonsoulin performs as a juvenile justice specialist providing technical assistance on a center funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). As a member of the Center for Coordinated Assistance to States (CCAS) he provides technical assistance to states, tribes, and local governments that receive OJJDP funding either through OJJDP’s Title II Formula Grants program or its Juvenile Accountability Block Grants (JABG) program. In this capacity he is also providing emergency preparedness technical assistance for juvenile justice residential facilities. Finally, he is the co-lead of the children of incarcerated parents program supported by the Federal Interagency Working Group. Prior to joining AIR, Mr. Gonsoulin was appointed to the Governor’s Cabinet in Louisiana as the Deputy Secretary of the Office of Youth Development where he led the state’s juvenile justice reform efforts for four years. As the Deputy Secretary he oversaw an annual budget of 182 million dollars and had statewide responsibilities of the newly created state agency which included secure care, probation and parole services and contracted community-based services for juvenile justice involved youth. As a professional educator, Mr. Gonsoulin served in many capacities ranging from classroom teacher, school principal, parish director of special education, and state director of juvenile justice education.

Kristin Henning
Director, Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative, Agnes N. Williams Research Professor of Law, Georgetown Law

Kris Henning is the Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative and the Agnes N. Williams Research Professor of Law at Georgetown Law.  Prior to her appointment to the Georgetown faculty, Professor Henning was an attorney at the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia where she helped organize and lead a Juvenile Unit designed to meet the multi-disciplinary needs of children in the juvenile justice system.

Professor Henning has been active in local, regional and national juvenile justice reform, serving as Director of the Mid-Atlantic Juvenile Defender Center (MAJDC), President of the Board of Directors for the Center for Children’s Law and Policy, and a member of local D.C. Superior Court committees such as the Delinquency Working Group and the Family Court Training Committee. Professor Henning has also served as an expert consultant to a number of state and federal agencies, including the US Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, and an investigator in several state assessments of the access to counsel and quality of representation for accused juveniles. She is currently the Reporter for the ABA Task Force on Standards for Dual-jurisdiction and Crossover Youth.

Professor Henning is also a lead author of the Juvenile Training Immersion Program (JTIP), a national training curriculum for juvenile defense attorneys across the country. She is a certified JTIP trainer and has organized numerous trainings for practicing juvenile defense attorneys across the country, including the JTIP Summer Academy, an annual week-long intensive training program for juvenile defense attorneys hosted at Georgetown Law in partnership with the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC). Professor Henning is also frequently invited to facilitate workshops for other stakeholders on the impact of implicit racial bias in the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

She has published a number of law review articles and book chapters on topics such as race and the juvenile justice system, children and the Fourth Amendment, and the role of policing in the legal socialization of African American boys. Her scholarship has appeared in journals such as the Cornell Law Review, California Law Review, and NYU Law Review and in books such as Punishment in Popular Culture (NYU Press, 2015; edited by Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. and Austin Sarat). Her article “Loyalty Paternalism and Rights” (Notre Dame Law Review, 2005) was cited by the Supreme Court in Graham v. Florida in 2010.  

In 2005, Kris was selected as a Fellow in the Emerging Leaders Program of the Duke University Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy and the Graduate School of Business at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.  In 2006 and 2007, Professor Henning traveled to Liberia to aid the country in juvenile justice reform and was awarded the 2008 Shanara Gilbert Award by the Clinical Section of the Association of American Law Schools for her commitment to social justice on behalf of children, service to the cause of clinical legal education, and interest in international legal education. In 2013, Professor Henning was awarded the Robert E. Shepherd, Jr. Award for Excellence in Juvenile Defense by NJDC, and in 2105, received an Award for Youth Justice from the DC Lawyers for Youth, was elected to American Law Institute (ALI), and was invited to serve as an Adviser to ALI’s Restatement on Children and the Law project.  Henning has been a visiting professor at Yale and NYU Law Schools and holds a B.A. from Duke University, a J.D. from Yale University, and an LL.M. from Georgetown University.

Denise Herz
Director and Full Professor, School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, California State University Los Angeles

Denise Herz, Ph.D., became faculty in the School of Criminal Justice & Criminalistics at Cal State Los Angeles in 2002 and has served as School Director since Fall 2012.  She is actively engaged in research locally and nationally.  Her primary area of research is in juvenile justice, with a particular emphasis on integrating systems to improve outcomes for youths at-risk for delinquency and for youths who have entered multiple systems. Since arriving in Los Angles, Dr. Herz has worked regularly with Los Angeles Superior Court, the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services, and the Los Angeles County Probation Department to improve practices for crossover youth (i.e., youth in child welfare who cross into juvenile justice), and with the Los Angeles County Probation Department to assess their practices and programs in order to improve outcomes for all Probation-involved youth.  She has also served as a consultant to the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy since 2008, participating in many initiatives including but not limited to leading the development and implementation of the Crossover Youth Practice Model Research Component.  Additionally, Dr. Herz acts as Research Director for the City of Los Angeles Gang Reduction and Youth Development Office since 2011.  Dr. Herz received her MA and Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Maryland at College Park. 

Dr. Carolyn Hill
Senior Fellow, MDRC

Carolyn Hill is a Senior Fellow at MDRC, and she is currently on leave from Georgetown University where she is Associate Professor of Public Policy. At MDRC, Hill is working on the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation, the Families Forward Demonstration, and the Understanding Poverty study. She helps lead MDRC’s Implementation Research Group, which supports innovative and rigorous implementation research methods across the organization’s policy areas and studies; and she is co-curator of MDRC’s Implementation Research Incubator. Hill is the author of three books and a number of journal articles that address implementation, public management, performance measurement, and program evaluation, including Public Management: Thinking and Acting in Three Dimensions. She earned a B.A. in political science and Russian area studies from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1989, an M.A. in public affairs from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1996, and a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Chicago in 2001.

Emily Hinkle
Independent Living Program Life Skills and My Life coach, PDX-Connect at New Avenues for Youth

Emily is an alumni of the Wyoming Foster Care System. She is an advocate for child welfare, mental health, and the LGBTQ population. She has contributed to work around the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) and the Young Adult Training and Technical Assistance Network (YATTA) since 2011 and continues this work with JBS International. In the summer of 2014 she was an intern at the National Resource Center for Youth Development and before that was a consultant for NRCYD working on NYTD. Emily, a Daniels Fund Scholar and Ambassador, graduated from Casper College in Casper, Wyoming, in May of 2014 with two Associate of Science degrees. She graduated from Portland State University in June of 2016 with bachelor’s degree in Women's Studies, minoring in Sexuality, Gender, and Queer Studies. While completing her degree she worked locally at the Regional Research Institute at Portland State University as a coach on the Better Futures Project. Nationally she works as a consultant to the National Capacity Building Center for the States at ICF International and a consultant to at JBS International working on NYTD. Currently she is an Independent Living Program Life Skills and My Life coach for PDX-Connect at New Avenues for Youth in Portland Oregon.

Judge Michael Howard
Former Administrative Judge, Domestic Relations Division, Stark County, OH

Judge Howard was elected to the Stark County Court of Common Pleas, Family Court Division in 2004. He first served the Court from 1974 to 1979 as an Intake Officer and Law Clerk for Judge W. Don Reader. He returned to the Court in 1991 to serve as Magistrate and, in 1999, he was appointed Chief Magistrate. Judge Howard is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and The University of Akron School of Law. He was a Certified Public Accountant and Senior Tax Manager at the international public accounting firm of Deloitte in Seattle, Washington. While living in Seattle, Judge Howard was a volunteer Guardian ad Litem for abused and neglected children.

Judge Howard is active as a community volunteer focusing primarily on programs helping children achieve success and avoid delinquent behavior. He co-chairs the Stark County Family Council’s Trauma and Resiliency Committee and chairs the Leadership Committee of the United Way of Greater Stark County. He is a member of the Justice Consortium of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and served two terms on the NCTSN Advisory Board. He has lectured widely on childhood trauma in the context of the juvenile justice system. Judge Howard is co-author of “Children Who Have Been Traumatized: One Court’s Response” which appeared in the 2008 autumn edition of the Juvenile and Family Court Journal. In 2007, Judge Howard was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ohio’s Board of Character and Fitness, which oversees admission to the bar in Ohio. He is a member of the Stark County Bar Association Family Law and Citizenship Committees, and also served on the Supreme Court of Ohio’s Advisory Committee on Domestic Violence.

Helen Jones-Kelley
Executive Director of the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board for Montgomery County, Ohio

HELEN JONES-KELLEY, the executive director of the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board system for Montgomery County, Ohio is also a consultant for Georgetown University’s Center on Juvenile Justice Reform in the McCourt School of Public Policy, where she is engaged with implementation of its Crossover Youth Practice Model. She is a licensed attorney, who earned her J.D. from the University of Dayton, her B.S. Ed. in Secondary English Education from Miami University and graduate training in Gerontology and Human Services Administration. Jones-Kelley is also a national Mental Health First Aid Instructor.

Prior employment experience includes Special Assistant and interim General Counsel at Central State University and nearly thirty years of executive leadership in juvenile justice and social services at the county and state levels, including a Gubernatorial Cabinet appointment as Director of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Montgomery County Juvenile Court, Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Program, Children Services and Montgomery County Job and Family Services. During her tenure with Juvenile Court, she was promoted to Assistant Legal Director and sat as a referee (magistrate) to hear cases on behalf of the juvenile court judge.

A frequent keynote speaker on children, family and legal issues, she has presented for numerous organizations. Her community service includes past Board chair, National CASA and Miami Valley Hospital and past president, Junior League of Dayton. She is past chair of the Educational Linkages Committee for the Central Area Links, Inc., and currently serves the Special Wish Foundation Advisory Board, Dayton Children Hospital’s Foundation Board, Dayton Performing Arts Alliance Advisory Board, Sinclair Community College Governing Board, Ohio CASA Board and Montgomery County’s Family and Children First Council and Workforce Investment Board. She is a co-Founder of Clothes That Work! and the African American Women’s Giving Circle. She has received numerous awards and honors over the course of her career, including YWCA Woman of Influence and Lifetime Achievement Awardee, Top Ten Women in Dayton, Woman of Integrity, Urban League’s Outstanding Community Volunteer, DayBreak’s Evangeline Lindsley Award, NASW’s Outstanding Community Advocate and SAFY’s Special Friend of Children, among others. She is married to Tom Kelley and their blended family includes nine grandchildren and two grand cats.

Jane Kallal
Executive Director, Family Involvement Center

Jane Kallal is one of the nation’s leading innovators in the field of human services, having championed development of family-driven care approaches in her local community, in shaping statewide systems of care, and as a national visionary, teacher, advocate and expert.

A parent first and foremost, Jane’s lived experiences raising an adopted daughter with complex mental health needs illuminated the challenges parents face to navigate multiple child-serving systems to leverage the expertise and resources essential for their children’s health, wellbeing and success. In 2000 Jane was invited to apply her hard-won expertise to the redesign of the Arizona service systems. She helped develop the state’s child and family team protocol, the parent support partner role, and the nation’s most expansive retooling of covered behavioral health services – three innovations that continue to form the basis for the statewide children’s behavioral health system in 2017.

Jane created an opportunity to apply professional skills from her corporate business career to bring to life Arizona’s resultant vision for family-driven care. In 2002 she founded Family Involvement Center, widely recognized as one of the nation’s premier family-run organizations. Since originally establishing the agency in Phoenix, Jane has nurtured “FIC” as a statewide hub for direct, parent-to-parent supports; and as a key partner with the full array of collaborating child and family-serving programs within education, health care, mental health, child welfare, disabilities, and juvenile justice systems. FIC’s diverse workforce of more than 60 parents energizes practical, innovative and compassionate support to parents. Many supported parents, in turn, lend their insights and efforts to help improve programs and services at both the provider agency and at statewide policy and systems levels in conformance with statewide policy and contracting requirements that have institutionalized those best practices.

Jane and her Family Involvement Center team have been in high demand with numerous states and federal agencies to build similarly family-driven approaches in light of growing evidence of their key functions in generating improved outcomes for children and families, in cost-effective ways that optimize contributions of families and the communities they live in. Since 2001 Jane has served on numerous statewide task forces and commissions, including the cross-system Arizona Children’s Executive Committee. In 2006 FIC established the Arizona Institute for Family Involvement as a national teaching resource; and she has also contributed her expertise to national technical assistance centers hosted by the National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health, Georgetown University, the University of Maryland, and the American institutes for Research; and as a founding member of the national Family-Run Executive Directors Leadership Association (FREDLA). Jane has advised numerous national programs for US Department of Health and Human Services (SAMHSA, CMS) and Department of Justice (OJJDP).

Daniel Kim
Director of Youth Organizing, Padres & Jóvenes Unidos

Daniel Kim is the Director of Youth Organizing at Padres & Jóvenes Unidos, a grassroots educational justice & immigrant rights organization based in Denver, built from the roots of the historic Chicano movement in the US Southwest. Daniel leads Padres’ 13-year campaign to End the School-to-Jail Track, taking on the racist push-out and criminalization of youth of color in Colorado’s public schools. The youth-led campaign has won a landmark package of reforms that has made Padres & Jóvenes Unidos a founder and leader of the national movement to end the school-to-prison pipeline: rewriting the discipline code of Denver Public Schools (DPS) into one of the most progressive in the country (Policy JK/JK-R, 2008), passing one of the first statewide laws to curb zero tolerance discipline (Smart School Discipline Law, 2012), and securing an Intergovernmental Agreement between the Denver Police Department and DPS (2013) to limit the role of law enforcement in school discipline. Most recently, Padres has joined with the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, DPS, Advancement Project and the NEA to launch the Denver Restorative Practices Partnership to scale up high quality school-wide implementation of restorative practices throughout DPS and to support efforts statewide and nationally. Trained by the Labor/Community Strategy Center, Daniel has been a social movement organizer for more than 14 years, organizing in schools and neighborhoods, on college campuses, and on the buses of Los Angeles to build the power of working-class communities of color to transform society. From 2002 - 2008 he was a faculty member of the English Department at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He has two children in Denver Public Schools.

Edward Latessa Ph.D.
Director and Professor of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati

Edward J. Latessa received his PhD from Ohio State University and is Director and Professor of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Latessa has published over 150 works in the area of criminal justice, corrections, and juvenile justice. He is co-author of eight books including What Works (and Doesn’t) in Reducing Recidivism, Corrections in the Community, and Corrections in America. Professor Latessa has directed over 150 funded research projects including studies of day reporting centers, juvenile justice programs, drug courts, prison programs, intensive supervision programs, halfway houses, and drug programs. He and his staff have also assessed over 600 correctional programs throughout the United States, and he has provided assistance and workshops in forty-eight states. Dr. Latessa served as President of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (1989-90). He has also received several awards including; Marguerite Q. Warren and Ted B. Palmer Differential Intervention Award presented by the Division of Corrections and Sentencing of the American Society of Criminology (2010), Outstanding Community Partner Award from the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections (2010), Maud Booth Correctional Services Award in recognition of dedicated service and leadership presented by the Volunteers of America (2010), Community Hero Award presented by Community Resources for Justice, (2010), the Bruce Smith Award for outstanding contributions to criminal justice by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2010), the George Beto Scholar, College of Criminal Justice, Sam Houston State University, (2009), the Mark Hatfield Award for Contributions in public policy research by The Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University (2008), the Outstanding Achievement Award by the National Juvenile Justice Court Services Association (2007), the August Vollmer Award from the American Society of Criminology (2004), the Simon Dinitz Criminal Justice Research Award from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (2002), the Margaret Mead Award for dedicated service to the causes of social justice and humanitarian advancement by the International Community Corrections Association (2001), the Peter P. Lejins Award for Research from the American Correctional Association (1999); ACJS Fellow Award (1998); ACJS Founders Award (1992); and the Simon Dinitz award by the Ohio Community Corrections Organization. In 2013 he was identified as one of the most innovative people in criminal justice by a national survey conducted by the Center for Court Innovation in partnership with the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the U.S. Department of Justice.

Lorrie Lutz
Chief Strategy Officer, FEDCAP

Lorrie L. Lutz serves as the Chief Strategy Officer of Fedcap, overseeing strategic planning, innovations in program design, strategic communications, the Community Impact Institute, the National Center for Innovation and System Improvement, the Leadership Academy and Fedcap’s Metrics That Matter initiative.

Prior to coming to Fedcap, Ms. Lutz served as the President of L3 P Associates, a consulting firm specializing in enhancing the quality of social services. For over 17 years Ms. Lutz provided technical assistance and training throughout the country and in the United Kingdom on diverse topics impacting children and youth in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems.

She authored numerous white paper and is nationally recognized for her expertise in child welfare, juvenile justice and system reform. Her most recent publications include: “Using Workforce Development Strategies to Move Youth in Foster Care to College-From Foster Care to Self Sufficiency”; “Relationship Between Resource Families, Birth Families and the System of Care; “Preventing the Triangulation of the Triangle of Support”, “Recruitment of Resource Families-The Promise and the Paradox”; “Achieving Permanence For Children- A Daunting Challenge” and Promising Practices in Adoption Competent Mental Health Services”.

Ms. Lutz’ past professional experience includes serving as the Director of the Division for Children Youth and Families for the State of New Hampshire, Bureau Chief for Family Services for the State of Idaho, Director of Community Services for Fort Leonard Wood Missouri, and Director of Community Programs for Catholic Charities in Minnesota.

Ms. Lutz received her undergraduate degree in Social Work at the University of Minnesota and her graduate degrees in Public Policy Administration from Webster University in St. Louis.

Monique Marrow, Ph.D.
Principal Owner, Youth Trauma and Justice Solutions

Monique Marrow holds a doctorate Degree in Child Clinical Psychology from The Ohio State University. She is a member of the National Childhood Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) and currently serves as an instructional Leader for the Center for Trauma Recovery and Juvenile Justice at the University of Connecticut, and as training specialist for the University of Kentucky Center on Trauma and Children. Both grants focus on the training and dissemination of trauma focused interventions for youth in the Juvenile Justice system or at risk for involvement in the system. Dr. Marrow has also served on NCTSN’s Steering Committee, Affiliate Advisory Board, Community Violence, Complex Trauma and Justice Consortium Committees. She is currently co-chair for the Juvenile Justice Treatment Sub Committee and co-authored a training curriculum with members of this committee entitled

Dr. Marrow has previously served as the Director for the Toledo Children’s Hospital Cullen Center a community based mental health center focused on providing services to youth and families impacted by trauma. Her experience in the field of juvenile justice includes a 12-year career with the Ohio Department of Youth Services where she served as a psychologist, psychology supervisor and finally as Deputy Director of Treatment and Rehabilitation Services for the Department. In 2006, while serving as Deputy Director she initiated the Department’s first trauma focused intervention program designed to provide training to staff, treatment programming for youth and modifications to environments, policies and practices to ensure they were consistent with trauma focused practice. This initiative is detailed in an article entitled “The Value of Implementing TARGET within a Trauma-Informed Juvenile Justice Setting”, which was published in a special issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma in August of 2012.

Dr. Marrow is a national trainer and consultant in the areas of trauma in several youth serving systems. Dr. Marrow is also an instructor with Georgetown University’s Center for Juvenile Justice Reform where she provides instruction to states and jurisdictions struggling to address issues of trauma in youth in their services systems. She is also consultant for the National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice, the Council of State Governments, as well as the McArthur Foundation.

Dr. Marrow has provided training and or consultation for juvenile justice or child serving agencies in Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Washington D.C., Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Puerto Rico.

Madge Pat Mosby
Retired System of Care Family Coach and Trainer, The Institute of Innovation and Implementation, University of Maryland Division of Social Work

Madge “Pat” Mosby is a Retired System of Care Family Coach and Trainer for The Institute of Innovation and Implementation at the University of Maryland Division of Social Work, which provides statewide technical assistance and training. Pat is a single mother of three children and a grandmother of four beautiful grandchildren. Pat’s involvement in children’s mental health began at home: she has three children, two with mental health challenges; one was on the Emotionally Disturbed Unit (which the title has now been changed) and the other, who was in Gifted and Talented Program in the Montgomery County School System. Pat has worked in the children’s mental health field for over 15 years, beginning as a consumer of services in the Wraparound process for her children. After receiving the support she needed for her children and gaining the ability to navigate the child serving agencies, she decided to help other families and became a Family Support Partner. She has assisted families in their effort to find the support they need and helped them to become empowered and knowledgeable about the system and the care for their children. When the opportunity presented itself, she became a Family Support Partner and then Care Coordinator, facilitating and coordinating the wraparound process while she working in a SAMHSA “Wraparound Grant Initiative” in Montgomery County, Maryland called “Community Kids.” She once stated she really liked the name because it included the youth with mental health challenges as part of the community and not as a problem in the community. Pat is an expert in the wraparound field and the engagement and partnership of families and youth. She has testified on the state and local level on behalf of children’s mental health and wraparound. Pat has trained and presented at national and state conferences, she has helped initiate youth involvement in Montgomery County, Maryland and peer support in several States around the Country. She has several certifications: National Certified Peer Support Partner, Certified Life Coach, CCAR Peer Recovery Coach and Trainer, Family Wraparound Coach and Trainer, Wellness Recovery Action Plan Facilitator Mental Health Core and Youth Frist Aid, Motivational Interviewing Trainer and Active Parenting Coach and Trainer. Pat continues to advocate and empower youth and families around the country.

Ed Mulvey, Ph.D.
Professor, University of Pittsburgh Department of Psychiatry

Dr. Edward Mulvey’s research focuses on violence and mental illness, prediction of future violence and crime, juvenile offenders, service provision in the juvenile justice system, and criminal justice policy. His research has investigated how clinicians make judgments about the risk posed by adults with mental illness and juvenile offenders, and what treatments are appropriate in these types of cases. He is also interested in the performance of public agencies serving criminal justice-involved individuals with mental health problems.

Dr. Mulvey directs the Law and Psychiatry Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society, a recipient of a Faculty Scholar’s Award from the William T. Grant Foundation, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, and a member of the National Science Foundation-funded National Consortium on Violence Research. He has also consulted for and written reports on mental health and juvenile justice policy for the U.S. Surgeon General’s Office, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the U.S. Secret Service. He serves as chair of the Science Advisory Board for the Office of Justice Programs at the U. S. Department of Justice and was a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Network on Mental Health and the Law and their Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice.

Dr. Mulvey graduated from Yale University before earning his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 1982. Dr. Mulvey’s bibliography contains over 120 publications in peer-reviewed journals.  

Nyamuon Nguany
Regional Coordinator, Youth Move Maine

Nyamuon Nguany is a Regional Coordinator for Youth Move Maine, a youth advocacy organization that helps at-risk youth find their voices and advocate for themselves. In this position Nyamuon also consults with the Maine Medical PIER program, a first episode psychosis recovery program geared toward supporting youth. Nyamuon uses her personal experience with childhood trauma and the gaps she has seen in her community to inform her work and drive her passion for policy change. More recently Nyamuon has partnered with the State of Maine where she co-created and co facilitates a cultural competency course offered to service providers and consumers, called "Why I can't trust you". This series of workshops aims to explore how we can be more conscientious about how we provide mental health services to communities who aren't familiar with the concepts, language and supports for mental health systems in this country.

Fariborz Pakseresht
Director, Oregon Youth Authority

Fariborz Pakseresht (Fair’-borz Pahk’-ser-esht) has served as Director of the Oregon Youth Authority (OYA) since March 2012. He joined OYA in 2008 after 19 years in a variety of leadership roles with Oregon State Government.

Over the course of the past few years, Fariborz has focused on enhanced use of data, research and analytics to inform decision making. Under his leadership, OYA currently is implementing a new, data-informed and research-based Youth Reformation System (YRS), which is aimed at driving down recidivism rates and improving positive outcomes for youth.

Karen Pittman
Co-Founder, President and CEO, Forum for Youth Investment

Karen has made a career of starting organizations and initiatives that promote youth development – including the Forum for Youth Investment, which she co-founded with Merita Irby in 1998. A sociologist and recognized leader in youth development, Karen started her career at the Urban Institute, conducting studies on social services for children and families. She later moved to the Children’s Defense Fund, launching its adolescent pregnancy prevention initiatives and helping to create its adolescent policy agenda. In 1990 she became a vice president at the Academy for Educational Development, where she founded and directed the Center for Youth Development and Policy Research and its spin-off, the National Training Institute for Community Youth Work.

In 1995 Karen joined the Clinton administration as director of the President's Crime Prevention Council, where she worked with 13 cabinet secretaries to create a coordinated prevention agenda. From there she moved to the executive team of the International Youth Foundation (IYF), charged with helping the organization strengthen its program content and develop an evaluation strategy. In 1998 she and Rick Little, head of the foundation, took a leave of absence to work with ret. Gen. Colin Powell to create America’s Promise. Upon her return, she and Irby launched the Forum, which later became an entity separate from IYF.

Karen has written three books and dozens of articles on youth issues, including as a regular columnist in the youth development newspaper, Youth Today. She is also a respected public speaker and has served on numerous boards and panels, including those of the Kauffman Foundation, the Educational Testing Service, the National Commission on the Senior Year of High School, the National Center for Children in Poverty, JCPenney Afterschool Fund, National Collaboration for Youth, and the High/Scope Educational Research Foundation Board. She currently sits on the America’s Promise Board of Trustees and YouthBuild USA. Karen has been honored with the National Commission for African American Education Augustus F. Hawkins Service Award (2002), the American Youth Policy Forum Decade of Service Award for Sustained Visionary Leadership in Advancing Youth Policy (2003) and the Healthy Teen Network Spirit of Service Award (2007), and in 2009 was recognized in The NonProfit Times' Power & Influence Top 50.

Lourdes Rosado
Bureau Chief, Civil Rights Bureau

Lourdes M. Rosado is the chief of the Civil Rights Bureau in the New York State Attorney General’s Office. The Civil Rights Bureau enforces laws that protect all New Yorkers from discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, military status, source of income or disability. The Bureau ensures justice and protects the rights of citizens in various venues including housing, education and employment. Prior to joining the Bureau in March 2016, Ms. Rosado was the Associate Director at the Juvenile Law Center, where she worked in a number of roles for approximately 17 years doing pioneering juvenile justice and child welfare work.  In addition to conducting litigation, Ms. Rosado has led policy and training initiatives to, among other things, divert youth from formal processing in the justice system. Ms. Rosado is a graduate of Swarthmore College, holds a J.D. from New York University School of Law, and an LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

Abram Rosenblatt, Ph.D.
Senior Study Director, Westat

Abram Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is a Westat Senior Study Director where he currently is the Project Director of the National Evaluation of the Children’s Mental Health Initiative funded by SAMHSA. Prior to joining Westat, he was a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) for over 25 years, where he served as the Associate Director of the NIMH funded UCSF Clinical Services Research Post-Doctoral Training Program and Director of the extramurally funded Child Services Research Group. He participated in the U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Mental Health, was a member of the California Little Hoover Commission’s select mental health advisory group, and has served on national panels and Initial Review Groups convened by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the National Institute of Developmental and Disability Research. In 2007 Dr. Rosenblatt was appointed as a William T. Grant Foundation Distinguished Fellow, which furthered his experience in policy and service delivery to children and adolescents with behavioral health needs and juvenile justice involvement. Dr. Rosenblatt is a member of several editorial boards and the author or co-author of over 50 publications and numerous technical reports.

Jodi Sandfort, Ph.D.
Professor, University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs

Jodi Sandfort is a Professor at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Her research, teaching, and practice all focus on improving the implementation of social policy, particularly those policies designed to support low-income children and their families.

Dr. Sandfort is the author of a recent book Cultivating Effective Implementation (Jossey Bass, 2015) with Stephanie Moulton. She has published thirty articles in academic peer review journals, including the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Nonprofit Management & Leadership, Social Services Review, Nonprofit Policy Forum, Community Development, and Administration & Society. She has contributed chapters to books on public management, technology enhanced learning, service networks, systems redesign, and research methodology. She also has authored over thirty reports for policymakers and practitioners in philanthropy, early childhood education, welfare reform, and workforce development, as well as numerous award-winning written teaching case studies and multi-media learning objects. She has served as Associate Editor on the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, and currently is on the editorial boards of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, American Review of Public Administration, and Journal of Public Affairs Education. She is currently on the Policy Council of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (national elected position) and was the co-chair of the 2015 Public Management Research Association Conference.

Dr. Sandfort seeks to bridge these various scholarly communities, as well as act as a conduit between the worlds of professional practice and academia. She currently is a Family Self-Sufficiency Scholar funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services focused on building research and analytical capacity in state human service bureaus. She is the founder and Academic Director of the Future Services Institute, an applied research and training center focused on public service redesign in partnership with state agencies, county governments, nonprofit service providers, and private foundations. She is also the Academic Director of the Hubert Project, a global initiative promoting interactive teaching and learning through use of multi-media learning materials (see http://www.hubertproject.org).

This commitment to bridging is long-standing. Dr. Sandfort was a Senior Fellow at the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits and directed the human service program at the McKnight Foundation in Minneapolis, where she managed a portfolio of $20 million in annual giving directed to the human service system in Minnesota. She worked as senior strategy consultant with the Bush Foundation and Special Assistant to the University of Minnesota’s President. Early in her career, she worked as a case manager for the AIDS Care Connection in Detroit, as a program assistant at the Children's Defense Fund in Washington, D.C., and as an assistant professor of public administration at the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. Recently, she worked with Program for African Governance and Social Science Research (PASGR) in an transnational initiative to build robust public policy masters’ degrees across 12 universities and the now is working with Azim Premji University in Bangalore, India as it seeks a similar goal. Throughout her scholarly career, she has raised over $4.3 million to support projects related to research, teaching or public engagement.

Sandfort received a Ph.D. in political science and social work in 1997 from the University of Michigan. She also holds a master's degree in social work from the University of Michigan and a B.A. from Vassar College (magna cum laude). She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Originally from Menomonie, Wis., Sandfort lives with her husband and two sons in St. Paul Minnesota where she likes to garden, practice Pilates, and play with their dog, Isabella. For more information and access to publications, please see: http://www.jodisandfort.org

Russell Skiba, Ph.D.
Director, The Equity Project and Professor, Indiana University

Russ Skiba is a Professor in the School Psychology program at Indiana University. He has worked with schools across the country in the areas of disproportionality, school discipline, and school violence. Skiba directs the Equity Project, a consortium of federal, state, and foundation-funded grants providing evidence to practitioners and policymakers in the areas of school violence, zero tolerance, and equity in education. Skiba was most recently director of the Discipline Disparities Research to Practice Collaborative, funded by Atlantic Philanthropies and the Open Society Foundation, a national effort bringing together key researchers, educators, and policymakers to increase research, policy and practice attention to disproportionality in discipline. He was a member of the writing team that produced the U.S. Department of Education's document on school safety Early Warning, Timely Response, and a member and lead author of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Zero Tolerance. Skiba has testified before the United States Civil Rights Commission, spoken before both Houses of Congress on issues of school discipline and school violence, and in 2008, acted as a special consultant to OSEP on issues of disproportionality and equity in special education. He was awarded the Push for Excellence Award by the Rainbow Coalition/Operation PUSH for his work on African American disproportionality in school suspension. His article Race is Not Neutral, won the Article of the Year award for the journal School Psychology Review in 2011.

Mark Soler
Executive Director, Center for Children’s Law and Policy

Mark Soler is the Executive Director of the Center for Children’s Law and Policy, a public interest law and policy organization in Washington, DC. He has spent more than 35 years working on juvenile justice reform throughout the country, first at the Youth Law Center and since 2006 at CCLP. While at the Youth Law Center, he worked on federal and state civil rights class action litigation over conditions of juvenile confinement in more than a dozen states. He also directed Building Blocks for Youth, a multi-state, multi-strategy initiative to reduce overrepresentation and racial and ethnic disparities affecting youth of color in the justice system. He oversaw efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Models for Change initiative, including the DMC Action Network. He has been a part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) since its inception in 1992. He has also been the leader of Stop Solitary for Kids, a national campaign to end solitary confinement of youth in the justice system. He has written more than 20 articles and book chapters on civil rights issues and the rights of children. He has taught at Boston College Law School, the Washington College of Law at American University, Boston University School of Law, the University of Nebraska Law School, and San Francisco State University. He has received awards for his work from the American Psychological Association, American Bar Association, Alliance for Juvenile Justice, and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Mark graduated from Yale University and Yale Law School.

Hon. Steven Teske
Chief Judge of the Juvenile Court of Clayton County, Georgia

Judge Steven C. Teske is the Chief Judge of the Juvenile Court of Clayton County, GA, and regularly serves as a Superior Court Judge by designation. He was appointed juvenile court judge in 1999. Judge Teske authored the School-Justice Partnership Model to reduce delinquency by promoting academic success using alternatives to suspensions and school-based arrests. Teske has testified before Congress on four occasions and several state legislatures on detention reform and zero tolerance policies in schools. The Governor has appointed him to the Children and Youth Coordinating Council, Governor’s Office for Children and Families, DJJ Judicial Advisory Council, JDAI Statewide Steering Committee, and the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. Teske was also appointed to the Georgia Criminal Justice Reform Commission and serves as chair of the Oversight and Implementation Committee (juvenile justice). He has served on the Council of SAGs of the Coalition of Juvenile Justice and the Federal Advisory Committee for Juvenile Justice, which advises the President and Congress on juvenile justice issues. He chairs the Southern Region of the Coalition of Juvenile Justice. He is a member of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and has served on the Board of Directors. He currently chairs the School Pathways Steering Committee and is vice-chair of the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee. He is past president of the Georgia Council of Juvenile Court Judges and the Clayton County Bar Association. He has written several articles on juvenile justice reform published in the Juvenile and Family Law Journal, Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, Juvenile Justice and Family Today, Family Court Review, and the Georgia Bar Journal. His book, Reform Juvenile Justice Now, is a collection of essays on juvenile justice issues. He is a Toll Fellow of the Council of State Governments and received his J.D., M.A., and B.I.S. degrees from Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA.

Dr. Ivory Toldson
President and CEO, Quality Education for Minorities Network

Dr. Ivory A. Toldson is the president and CEO of the QEM Network, professor of counseling psychology at Howard University and editor-in-chief of The Journal of Negro Education. Previously, Dr. Toldson was appointed by President Barack Obama to devise national strategies to sustain and expand federal support to HBCUs as the executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (WHIHBCUs). He also served as senior research analyst for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and contributing education editor for The Root, where he debunked some of the most pervasive myths about African-Americans in his Show Me the Numbers column.

Dr. Toldson was dubbed a leader "who could conceivably navigate the path to the White House" by the Washington Post, one of "30 leaders in the fight for Black men," by Newsweek Magazine, and the "Problem Solver" by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education. Dr. Toldson, according to former U.S. Secretary Arne Duncan, is "a prolific young scholar and myth buster." According to NPR, Dr. Toldson has "a desire to shed new light on old issues." A sought after speaker, Dr. Toldson has been featured on MSNBC, C-SPAN2 Books, NPR News, POTUS on XM Satellite Radio, and numerous national and local radio stations. In print, his research has been featured in The Washington Post, CNN.com, The New York Times, The Root, The National Journal, Essence Magazine, BET.com, The Grio, and Ebony Magazine.

Dr. Toldson was named in the 2013 and 2014 The Root 100, an annual ranking of the most influential African-American leaders. His body of research was featured in The Foundation Center report, Building a Beloved Community, for his role in shaping sponsored programs for Black male achievement. Dr. Toldson was awarded the: Equity Champion Award from the New York City Department of Education; Outstanding Alumni Award from Penn State Black Alumni Association; Top 25 Forensic Psychology Professors, ForensicsColleges.com; and The Emerging Scholar designation from the Diverse Magazine.

Dr. Toldson was promoted to full professor while on leave from Howard University to serve President Obama’s administration. He spent 3.5 years at Southern University and A&M College (SU), in Baton Rouge, LA, and more than a decade at Howard University in Washington, DC. At SU, Dr. Toldson was named young researcher of the year after successfully competing for the prestigious W.E.B. DuBois Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Justice. Dr. Toldson continued a high level of research productivity at Howard University, evidence by publishing 4 books, and more than 65 scholarly publications including articles in peer-refereed journals, book chapters, and policy reports. Dr. Toldson became the Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Negro Education (established 1932) in 2008, where he lead an effort to modernize The Journal, moving it to an online platform for peer reviews and subscriptions, while keeping it independently owned and run by Howard University. His efforts attracted many new international subscribers.

Dr. Ivory A. Toldson was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the executive director, for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. In addition to ongoing work with elected officials, government executives, HBCU leaders and advocacy groups, Dr. Toldson conceptualized the White House Initiative on HBCUs All-Stars program, which identifies and engages the top HBCU scholars. He also co-authored a series of blogs on federal sponsorships for various federal agencies and hosted a series of webinars, in an effort to increase the approximately $6 billion of federal revenue that flows to 100 HBCUs.

Dr. Toldson has also served as senior research analyst for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. There, he conceptualized, developed and authored the Breaking Barriers series for CBCF, which analyzed success indicators for school-aged Black males. The Breaking Barriers series has been featured in numerous publications. Dr. Toldson has worked effectively with members of the Congressional Black Caucus and their staff to organize national and district level forums on educational equity and access. In his role, Dr. Toldson interacted with many foundation executives and corporate sponsors to raise revenue for CBCF programs, including research and scholarships.

Dr. Toldson has varied executive leadership experiences and has served many advisory boards. He is an executive board member of The Mount Vernon Triangle Community Improvement District a private, nonprofit organization established to enhance the overall quality of life for residents, visitors, employees and property owners in the Mount Vernon Triangle neighborhood of Washington, DC. He is also an advisory board member for Generation Ready and the Morehouse Research Institute, and on the board of directors for the National Council on Educating Black Children, a premier non-profit and civil rights organization with a distinguished focus on improving educational opportunities and outcomes for African American children.

After completing coursework for a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology at Temple University, Dr. Toldson became a correctional and forensic psychology resident at the United States Penitentiary. There, he completed his dissertation on Black Men in the Criminal Justice System. He also served as the clinical director of the Manhood Training Village. He has received formal training in applied statistics from the University of Michigan, and held visiting research and teacher appointments at Emory, Drexel, and Morehouse School of Medicine. Since graduate school, Dr. Toldson has had a career-long affiliation with HBCUs and takes pride in his ability to promote HBCU scholarship and being an example of professional talent cultivated at HBCUs. He holds an honorary doctorate from Florida Memorial University. He is married to Marshella Toldson, and together, they are raising their daughter, Makena and their son, Ivory Kaleb.

Michelle Francois Traiman
Director, National Center for Youth Law’s Foster Youth Education Initiative, Foster Ed

Michelle (Francois) Traiman is Director of NCYL’s Foster Youth Education Initiative (Foster Ed). Traiman brings more than 20 years of experience in the non-profit and philanthropy sectors, as well as substantial expertise in child welfare and education. Most recently, she served as the Associate Director of Child Welfare with the Stuart Foundation, where she led a major initiative to improve education outcomes for foster youth across California. Her life’s work has been focused on helping young people realize the vastness of their potential and supporting systems change efforts that put the needs of youth at the center of policies and practices. Michelle’s life and work experience span a broad spectrum: as an artist, stage director, community activist, strategic planner and program director – all the while as a passionate advocate for young people and families. Her superpower is finding out what is uniquely awesome about people, lives in San Francisco with her amazing husband, Cliff and step-son Theo and holds a Bachelor of Arts from Macalester College in Minnesota.

Honorable Louis A. Trosch, Jr.
District Court Judge, 26th Judicial District, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

Judge Louis A. Trosch, Jr., is a District Court Judge in the 26th Judicial District in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. He and his wife, Cathie Trosch, have two children, Lou and Pressley. After graduating from West Charlotte High School, Judge Trosch received a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Washington & Lee University in 1988, Magna Cum Laude, and his Juris Doctor in 1992 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law, where he graduated Order of the Coif. He has served as District Court Judge in the Juvenile and Family Courts since 1999. Prior to the bench Judge Trosch worked first as an assistant public defender and then as an attorney at the Children’s Law Center. Subsequently, he practiced as a litigator with the law firm of Conrad, Trosch & Kemmy, PA, while also serving as the firm’s Managing Attorney. In July of 2010 Judge Trosch was the first Judge in North Carolina to be certified by the National Association of Counsel for Children as a Child Welfare Law Specialist.

During his tenure on the bench Judge Trosch has served in all of the varied District Courts with distinction. Awarded the NC Distinguished Jurist Award in October 2011 by the NC District Court Judges’ Association, he has proven as adept at handling an equitable distribution matter as he is with hearing a DWI trial. Beginning in 2002 Judge Trosch was selected to oversee the 26th Judicial District’s Juvenile Courts, a position he maintained until 2008. He continues to lead many collaborative reform efforts underway in Mecklenburg County. In recognition of this cooperative approach, in May of 2012 Judge Trosch was presented with the Lucille P. Giles Volunteerism Award by Florence Crittendon Services for his collaborative work on behalf of children and families. Such initiatives include: a permanency mediation program in dependency court that has become a state and national model; a Truancy Court Program held in selected elementary and middle schools for at risk youth; a Youth Treatment Court for juvenile offenders with substance abuse issues; a Drug Court Program for parents, whose children have been placed into the custody of the Department of Social Services; the development and implementation of a Juvenile Court automated data system (implemented statewide as J-WISE); a geo-district system of case assignment to improve court efficiency and teamwork among agency representatives; an Arts and Science Collaborative designed to involve court involved youth in positive extracurricular activities and better coordination of multi-system and community collaborative efforts in Mecklenburg County.

In fact, Judge Trosch has become a nationally recognized expert regarding collaboration between court systems and various community groups, having traveled across the United States to speak on this topic. He has twice testified before Congress. First, he appeared before the Senate Finance Committee in July, 2011 regarding the impact of the federally funded Court Improvement Program, which fosters collaboration and spreads best practices among Juvenile Dependency Courts. In March of 2012 Judge Trosch returned to Washington and testified at a special roundtable briefing surrounding trauma informed justice and the Defending Childhood Initiative. Further, in October, 2011 Judge Trosch again traveled to Washington, DC to participate with a team of local officials in the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform’s Certificate Program for Public Sector Leaders to plan a multi-systems approach to child welfare issues.

Judge Trosch is active in the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ), and was appointed to their Board of Trustees in July 2008. He has Co-Chaired the Resource Development Committee and the Permanency Planning for Children Department’s Advisory Committee and has served on the NCJFCJ Diversity, Legislative, and Finance Committees. He also serves on the National Steering Committee for the Courts Catalyzing Change Project, which is designed to reduce the overrepresentation of children of color in abuse and neglect courts. Locally he served as his Model Court’s Lead Judge from 2002 until 2008. Judge Trosch has spoken across the nation about the impact of implicit bias in Juvenile Court Systems. He also participated in the NCASA Inclusiveness and Outreach Committee and previously consulted with the National Center for State Courts for that organization’s Implicit Bias Project. Not only does Judge Trosch participate in these important national initiatives, but he brings many lessons learned and best practices back home to North Carolina for local and statewide implementation. For example, Judge Trosch serves on the North Carolina Commission on Racial Disparities in the Criminal Justice System. Locally, he Co-Chairs Mecklenburg County’s Race Matters for Juvenile Justice Initiative, which is dedicated to ending disparate outcomes for children in the 26th Judicial District. Under his leadership, RMJJ has become a model for change for communities across the nation.

Also active in his local community and the Mecklenburg County Bar (MCB), Judge Trosch just joined the MCB Board of Trustees Class of 2018. He also currently serves on the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, Co-Chaired the Bench Bar and Community Sub-Committee in 2014/2015, and is a member of the Juvenile Law Section. He previously Chaired the Institute for Social Capital, a partnership between the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, local business leaders, and child welfare agencies, from 2006 through 2011; has served on the Board of the Mecklenburg Citizens for Public Education; sat on the Steering Committee for the System of Care Initiative (MeckCares) in conjunction with the Area Mental Health Authority; has Co-Chaired the Mecklenburg County Management Information System Sub-Committee; Co-Chaired the Dependency Mediation Committee; participated in the United Agenda for Children; and served on the North Carolina Bar Association’s 4ALL Task Force, a statewide effort to make legal services available to citizens living in poverty. Recognizing Judge Trosch’s ongoing commitment to improving our justice system, Governor Pat McCrory recently appointed Judge Trosch to the Juvenile Justice Planning Committee of the Governor’s Crime Commission in 2015. In response to all of his efforts, both inside and outside of the courtroom, Judge Trosch was named as one of North Carolina’s Leaders in the Law by NC Lawyers Weekly and honored at a ceremony on September 23, 2016.

Jennifer Woolard, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology, Georgetown University

An associate professor of psychology at Georgetown University, Jennifer Woolard began her career at the National Victims Resource Center. While obtaining her doctoral degree in developmental and community psychology at the University of Virginia she also served as a victim-witness volunteer in the county police department, a staff member to the Virginia Commission on Family Violence Prevention and a consultant with Virginians Against Domestic Violence (now Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance) . She then joined the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice and became an assistant professor at the University of Florida’s Center for Studies in Criminology and Law. In 2002 she joined the psychology faculty at Georgetown University where she serves as co-director of their graduate program, supervising the Human Development and Public Policy track. Her research and action laboratory, the Georgetown Community Research Group, examines how individuals and families interact with systems in communities, including how first responders and veterans receive mental health treatment. Her Center for Research on Adolescence, Women, and the Law concentrates on care and control systems, including the juvenile and criminal justice systems and schools. Projects examine how youth and parents understand the right to remain silent, the right to an attorney, and the right to a trial. Dr. Woolard has testified as an expert before federal and state legislatures as well as in criminal cases. She has presented her research findings to a wide variety of academic, legal, and policy audiences, and won several awards for teaching excellence.

 

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