LEAD 2017

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at McCourt is looking forward to hosting you at the 2017 LEAD Conference: Moving From Research to Policy and Practice to Improve the Lives of Youth (April 6-7). Should you need to refund your ticket, please do so by Wednesday, March 8. Be advised that the McCourt School will be unable to provide a refund after that date. Thank you!

 

Conference Agenda

(download PDF version - including speakers)
7:30am—8:30am

Registration and Breakfast

8:30am—9:00am

Welcome

9:00am—9:45am

Opening Keynote Presentation
The keynote will feature a leader who has been working effectively to bring together key constituencies/stakeholders across systems to effectuate research-based policy and practice change that is positively impacting at-risk children, youth and families.

9:45am—10:00am

Break

10:00am—12:00pm

Current Research/What We Know (Plenary)
This session will highlight cutting-edge research developments in fields of child-welfare, juvenile justice, education, behavioral health, and family engagement.  Nationally-renowned researchers from each field will discuss these research innovations in depth and outline the potential for that research to lead to meaningful changes in policy and practice.  

12:00pm—1:00pm

Lunch

1:00pm—3:00pm

Moving from Research to Policy and Practice (Plenary)
Across the U.S., policymakers and practitioners have successfully translated innovations in research into meaningful changes in policy and practice. This session will showcase leaders’ transformational efforts to implement positive changes at the system, community, and individual decision-making levels, across domains of child welfare, juvenile justice, education, behavioral health, and family engagement.

3:00pm—3:15pm

Break

3:15pm—5:00pm
Breakout Sessions
Breakout sessions will offer participants the opportunity to further explore the implications of research, policy and practice examined in the previous plenaries on the areas most relevant to their work and interests:
 
 
April 7, 2017
 
7:30am—8:30am

Registration and Breakfast

8:30am—8:45am

Welcome

8:45am—9:45am

Presentation of Inaugural Janet Reno Women's Leadership Award
The inaugural Janet Reno Endowment Women's Leadership Award will be presented to Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and President of the Children’s Defense Fund. The award recognizes an individual who has demonstrated a commitment and ability to effect change in her community or organization to benefit youth, particularly those at-risk of entering the juvenile justice or child welfare systems. After receiving the award, Mrs. Edelman will offer remarks.

9:45am—10:00am

Break

10:00am—11:45am

Breakout Sessions
Breakout sessions will offer participants the opportunity to further explore the implications of research, policy and practice examined in the previous plenaries on the areas most relevant to their work and interests:

11:45am—12:00pm

Break

12:00pm—1:30pm

Understanding Implementation: Moving from Fidelity to Fit (Plenary)
This session will focus on sharing what is known from the field of public policy implementation research, highlighting the complex system dynamics often involved when implementing new initiatives in the public arena. Drawing upon research and theory, it will provide language and action principles to help change makers operate more purposively in the face of such complexity.  The session will weave together the previous sessions to highlight what we have learned about effective implementation in youth-serving fields--what has worked, what has not, and the implications for our future efforts.

1:30pm

Lunch/Adjourn

 

 

Breakout sessions

Breakout sessions will offer participants the opportunity to further explore the implications of research, policy and practice examined in the previous plenaries on the areas most relevant to their work and interests.  

Advances in Child Welfare:

There has been a tremendous learning curve in child welfare policy and practice in the last several years. One area in particular that has received much attention and grown in importance is our work to better support the permanency and self-sufficiency of system-involved youth. This panel will feature research, agency-level, practitioner, consultant, and family/youth perspectives in exploring the evolution of our work in this area, and the developments and challenges in establishing permanency and self-sufficiency for the youth in our care.

Suspension and Expulsion Policies and Practices:

Our country has seen significant increases in the use of suspension, expulsion and referral to the juvenile justice system in response to student misbehavior in our schools. Research over the past several years has documented the negative effect of these policies, particularly when used in a discriminatory manner, having a disproportionate impact on youth of color. This session will engage research, superintendent, judicial, law enforcement, and youth perspectives to discuss current developments and challenges in reducing excessive suspensions and expulsions, in favor of more targeted and effective practices designed to keep our youth connected to school.

Youth Corrections Reform:

There has been a major shift in youth corrections policy and practice over the past decade, with a greater emphasis on supervising juvenile justice system-involved youth in their own communities through targeted treatment, services and supports. This shift has included the use of validated risk and needs assessment instruments, structured decision-making tools, and quality assurance measures that help ensure the effectiveness of the services being delivered to our youth. Even with this shift, many youth are still placed in residential treatment facilities and require services that address their needs. This session will engage juvenile justice research, agency, practitioner, trainer, and youth perspectives to discuss developments and challenges in enhancing youth corrections practice, including facility-based and community reentry approaches that advance positive youth development.

Research-Based Approaches for Multi-System Youth:

We have known for many years that youth and families involved in multiple systems of care present a complex set of needs and challenges, requiring systems to work together in a more collaborative manner. These needs surface across multiple domains including education, substance use, mental health, child welfare and juvenile justice, requiring systems to adopt new policies and practices that facilitate the required level of coordination. This session will engage multi-system research, agency, judicial, attorney, and family/youth perspectives in discussing the current developments and challenges in better serving this population of youth and their families.

Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Youth-Serving Systems:

One of the most significant challenges we face in our efforts to serve system-involved youth and their families is to ensure that we treat them in a fair and equitable manner; that our response to allegations of abuse and neglect and delinquent behavior is the same regardless of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression. In response to this challenge, research-based and data-driven policies and practices have been adopted across the country. This session will engage research, policy, agency, judicial, law enforcement, and family perspectives to discuss developments and challenges in addressing the disproportionate representation of youth of color in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems.

Advances in Trauma-Informed Approaches Across Systems of Care:

In our efforts across systems to better meet the needs of system-involved youth and their families, we must address the substance use and mental health-related issues confronting them. This session will focus on how systems coordinate their efforts to assess the behavioral health needs of the youth and families they serve, exploring how best to align the assessment of those needs with the matching of treatment, services and supports. This session will engage mental health research, agency, judicial, practitioner, and youth perspectives to discuss developments and challenges in meeting the behavioral health needs of our system-involved youth and their families, with a particular focus on trauma-informed care.